A vision for large-scale projects in Germany

A vision for large-scale projects in Germany

Major projects and Germany – for years a subject with explosive force. Projects such as Stuttgart 21, the Elbe Philharmonic or the Berlin airport are negative examples of how important projects should not be designed and implemented. Against this background, the Federal Government has initiated the Reform Commission major projects in 2013.

Major projects and Germany – for years a subject with explosive force. Projects such as Stuttgart 21, the Elbe Philharmonic or the Berlin airport are negative examples of how important projects should not be designed and implemented. Against this background, the Federal Government has initiated the Reform Commission major projects in 2013.

The task of the Forum is to develop a package of measures so that time and cost plans of infrastructure projects can be better acted and complied. The final report is now available. The focus is on a 10 -point action plan, which has to be considered and respected in all projects:

1. Cooperative Planning in Team
2. First plan, then build
3. Risk management and identification of risks in the household
4. Allocation to the most economical, not the cheapest
5. Partnership project collaboration
6. Extrajudicial settlement
7. Binding economic feasibility study
8. Clear processes and responsibilities / competence centers
9. Increased visibility and control
10. Use of digital methods – Building Information Modeling (BIM)

Especially with the potential risks, the Reform Commission recommends a transparent and open risk management. Essential for the success is also a continuous public participation – the sooner the better. In the case of particularly controversial projects, where resistance by citizens and stakeholders is foreseeable, possible planning alternatives have to be discussed before a regional planning procedure. Then there is still the chance of a credible and consensual development. The Commission’s recommendations for public participation can be summarized in the following three aspects:

  • Early, open and ongoing citizen participation – namely when there are actual decision leeway
  • Project costs are only communicated to publicly if they are also sufficiently robust
  • Citizens need to be informed about any possible changes during the entire project planning and implementation period